Pinole Valley High School

November 4, 2016

Video courtesy of: http://www.cccleanwater.org/

Pinole Valley High Earth Team interns have conducted their 2nd litter assessment of Pinole Creek and Pinole Valley High this week. Litter is a major environmental issue worldwide. 70% of marine debris litter is land based and travels down storm drains, through creeks, and streams, and eventually to beautiful SF Bay. From there litter floats into the Pacific Coast and onward. The most common type of litter is cigarette butts, and plastic. Earth Team discovered this firsthand. Plastics and cigarette butts made the majority of the litter removed...

November 4, 2016

Video courtesy of: http://www.cccleanwater.org/

Pinole Valley High EarthTeam interns have conducted their 2nd litter assessment of Pinole Creek and Pinole Valley High this week. Litter is a major environmental issue worldwide. 70% of marine debris litter is land based and travels down storm drains, through creeks, and streams, and eventually to your beautiful SF Bay. From there litter floats into the Pacific Coast and onward. The most common type of litter is cigarette butts, and plastic. EarthTeam discovered this firsthand. Plastics and cigarette butts made the majority of the litter removed along Pinole Creek....

November 4, 2016

Video courtesy of: http://www.cccleanwater.org/

Pinole Valley High Earth Team interns have conducted their 2nd litter assessment of Pinole Creek and Pinole Valley High this week. Litter is a major environmental issue worldwide. 70% of marine debris litter is land based and travels down storm drains, through creeks, and streams, and eventually to beautiful SF Bay. From there litter floats into the Pacific Coast and onward. The most common type of litter is cigarette butts, and plastic. Earth Team discovered this firsthand. Plastics and cigarette butts made the majority of the litter removed...

October 27, 2016
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Earth Team intern, Brenda Moreida, removing the invasive plant species Cape Ivy.

Himalayan Blackberry, Cape Ivy, and English Ivy have proven to be tough contenders against Pinole Valley High interns. These three plant species are non-native and completely dominate areas of Pinole Creek banks. Native plants that help the ecosystem thrive are lacking in resources and space, due to these highly invasive non-native plants outcompeting...